Video: Green Hills Software on the future of Linux in the connected car

Posted by Jan Stojaspal [1] on May 16, 2014

David Kleidermacher, CTO, Green Hills Software, on how to get the best out of Linux without compromising the connected car’s data security.

In this video [2] from the Consumer Telematics Show 2014, David Kleidermacher, CTO, Green Hills Software, speaks with TU’s Robert Gray about Linux being good for many things in the connected car but not the answer for everything.

According to Kleidermacher, Linux is a great operating environment for multimedia and apps. “If you look at it in the mobile phone world, it’s enormous,” he says, adding that the same thing is starting to happen in the connected car space.

The things speaking for Linux include the ease of getting started with it, the fact that it’s open, that people can customize it easily and that it is set to become ubiquitous. For example, Tesla Motors’ Model S has Linus running its critically acclaimed infotainment system, and Google’s self-driving cars are also running Linux for parts of their system.

“But because of its ubiquity, because of the momentum in the industry, with all these middleware apps and tons of developers modifying it all the time, it is of course going to be susceptible to more vulnerability,” he says.

But even for these situations, there are solutions. Green Hills Software offers one called “Integrity Multivisor,” which allows OEMs and tier 1s to safely integrate multimedia and safety-critical functions into a single box, Kleidermacher says.

He concludes on a prediction that in five to ten years, “some flavor of Linux,” whether it be GENIVI or Android or Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is going to be ubiquitous in the connected car. “The big question is going to be what parts of the electronics system in the car is going to be managed by Linux, what part will be handled by other things, and how is it all going to work together,” he says.


Robert Gray is a regular contributor to Telematics Update.

For all the latest telematics trends, check out Data Business for Connected Vehicles Japan 2014 [3] on May 14-15 in Tokyo, Telematics India and South Asia 2014 [4] on May 28-29 in Bangalore, India, Insurance Telematics Canada 2014 [5] on May 28-29 in Toronto, Telematics Update Awards 2014 [6] on June 3 in Novi, Michigan, Telematics Detroit 2014 [7] on June 4-5 in Novi, Michigan, Advanced Automotive Safety USA 2014 [8] on July 8-9 in Novi, Michigan, Insurance Telematics USA 2014 [9] on Sept. 3-4 in Chicago, Telematics Japan 2014 [10] in October in Tokyo and Telematics Munich 2014 [11] on Nov. 10-11 in Munich, Germany.

For exclusive telematics business analysis and insight, check out TU’s reports: Insurance Telematics Report 2014 [12]Connected Fleet Report 2014 [13]The Automotive HMI Report 2013 [14] and Telematics Connectivity Strategies Report 2013 [15]